Beach Bonfire Guide

While June 21st is the start of Summer by astrological measurement and the Augustan Calendar, us preps get off to an earlier start. Every Memorial Day Weekend, we break out our whites, seersucker, and pastel prints for the Summer. While we treat this weekend as the beginning of the warmest time of the year, the weather patterns don’t always favor our plans for leisure.

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This past weekend, I was lounging in Chatham with my friends from Pomfret, Groton, Phillips Andover, Westminster, and Nobles. Our most challenging decision involved choosing whether to day drink at Chatham Bars Inn or Wychmere We celebrated our final night in quintessential fashion. While I grilled out for the gals, my friend mixed up some cocktails for overconsumption in the parlor. He is an alumnus of the Harvard School of Mixology and did not disappoint. Following a few stiff rounds, us gents decided to head out and start a bonfire on the beach. What could be a better night cap to the final evening of the weekend?

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Upon collecting fuel for the fire and arriving at the beach, it began to rain. Time was of the essence, and we had limited resources. Naturally, I took charge.IMG_7323

Here is a list of instructions which may help you the next time you are tasked with starting a beach bonfire even if you have limited resources and subpar conditions.

Step 1: Acquire some industrial sized palettes. Preferably of the seafood market variety.

Step 2: Find a secluded beach area. Preferably private.

Step 3: Dig your fire pit.

Step 4: Line the base of your fire pit with sand, rocks, or wet seaweed to prevent your fire from increasing in surface area. You don’t want to burn your beach house unless of course you have a fat insurance policy you can leverage to buy a house with a better view.

Step 5: Collect small sticks, lint, dry seaweed, and newspaper for tinder (not the dating app).

Step 6: Separate tinder to increase surface area and airflow.

Step 7: Place tinder underneath a corner of the palettes.

Step 8: Add a splash of high proof alcohol (Don Julio works like a charm).

Step 9: Collect larger pieces of dry drift wood, logs, or whatever other fuel you can find (private property signs always make for phenomenal fuel).

Step 10: Spark, blow, and watch it grow.

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Other tips:

-Marshmellows roast best on embers, not flames

-Don’t use towels or blankets if it’s raining

-Remember to bring a stocked cooler, but don’t waste all of the Goose on a fire you can start with nautical resources

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Prep School Grads – Sterling Archer

A few years ago, an American spy satire aired. Archer is a deadly concoction of James Bond’s suave style, plenty of action, and cynical humor. One woman’s douche is another’s prep school grad.

He spent up to 15 years at boarding school, despite American schooling taking 13 years. His hobby was lacrosse, and flashbacks have indicated he had few friends. At age 18, he was regarded as the most recruited lacrosse player in America, although an incident with a crazed stalker gut-shooting him cost him both his lacrosse career and a possible scholarship to Johns Hopkins University (although it is implied this would not have happened anyway because of his poor SAT scores). A picture of Archer in Placebo Effect shows him graduating from Georgetown University, implying he is at least smart enough to receive a bachelor’s degree in an unknown major (although according to his mother, he flunked out of college).

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Clash of the Titans – Avon Old Farms vs. Deerfield Academy

Outside of the MIAA in Maryland, the Founders League boasts the most depth in the country. AOF and Deerfield are two perennial contenders for the league title. Take note of the names in the highlights as you will see them again and again in NCAA scoresheets in the seasons to come.

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the men of the sea

It had been quite some time since I had gone through my T&V email. Sifting through junk mail and spam offers from that oafish brand chubbies, I  found a diamond in the rough when I received an email from Zeke, a student at BB&N. Zeke is the representative of a clothing line called “men of the sea.” What Zeke brought to my attention was not only another clever example of prep school students swimming against the current, but also another story of a prep school administration oppressing its students and their freedom of expression.

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The story Zeke shared with me begins in the bitter cold month of February on campus. BB&N advertises their dress code as being the 6 B’s (no boobs, back, butt, belly, bra, or boxers). So, surely no students would have been bold enough to have violated these rules. However, shortly after launching his company with his brother, Zeke was called into the Dean’s office. Throughout the school day, the men of the sea had been selling inventory to their classmates. Like a tidal wave, the students of BB&N flooded the campus showcasing their new favorite brand. Coming from the student body, this was a sign of support for their classmates and good taste in an up-and-coming preppy brand. Apparently, some opposed the brand. One could suppose that some students or faculty may have even been looking for an excuse to get Zeke in trouble. But, that is neither here, nor there.

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In the office, the Dean explained to Zeke how he thought the brand was inappropriate because some students had complained to him that they were offensive. Countering the Dean, Zeke argued that the logo could not be deemed inappropriate since sperm is a subject of discussion in mandatory biology and sex-ed coursework. Additionally, BB&N had hosted assemblies on sex and healthy relationships. [Side note: assemblies like these are often used by pubescent preps to make witty sexual wisecracks and are hardly productive educational platforms. Unless of course, you decide to ask the sex-ed expert about the theoretical possibility for a couple to execute the Nantucket Sleigh Ride.]

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Zeke told me this: “To me, this knee-jerk reaction of labeling something you may not particularly like as ‘offensive’ is a disgusting behavior. I questioned whether I could come to him and say a Nike logo was offensive to me and that I wanted Nike banned from the school. He didn’t have a good answer to this other than that it was his judgement call. Sounds pretty tyrannical.” This logic is socially relevant in the war on political correctness today which is one of the reasons why we champion freedom fighters like the men of the sea.

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By March, The Vanguard, a student-run newspaper at BB&N had interviewed Zeke and his brother. An article was composed profiling the boys, their brand, and the administration’s choice to abolish it from campus. According to Zeke, “To further assert the administration’s tyranny and hindering of freedom of expression and speech, the administration did not allow the article to be published.”

Our staff does not agree with many policies made by prep school administrations these days. For example, when The Boss was a senior, he was forced to take down a video of the headmaster breaking up a staged lucha libre fight on halloween or face the threat of expulsion. We want to know your opinion. Should the brand have been banished from campus? Has it been banished from your campus? What do you think?

 

 

 

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Revamp

Hoss dropped the ball. Who’s to blame? It’s not out of character for a freshman to drop the slack at an all boys Catholic school. But, you can’t really blame El Hoss. It’s pretty hard to run the internet’s only prep school website that also doubles as a Deep Web marketplace for gambling away Nantucket estate rights. That’s why I’m back…

With any return, a story is in order.

Some would call this limbo a party and sorority girl induced inception; we like to refer to it as college.

Although your teachers have been preparing you for some mystical extension of our beloved high ceiling halls, it’s best described as a shit show out here. Prep schools charge your parents egregious sums of money, not for academic preparation, but so that you can outwit public-school kids on a day to day basis. While the public schoolers are running late, fumbling with their shitty windsor knots for formal events, us blue bloods are already have executed a perfect dimple, having the luxury of conversing with our dates and theirs about weekends in Kennebunkport and summer trips to the Amalfi Coast. Although most stories are structured with character and plot development, narrative and morals, this one is not. I think we all get the drift.

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This is why Twines and Vines is coming out from retirement for the summer. Interning in a cubicle for the summer is JV compared to writing about prep school ongoings from a Harkness table.

We are looking for contributors. If your parents are nagging you to put another internship on your college apps, or you have a true passion for writing about anything pertaining to the prep school lifestyle, shoot me an email at theboss@twinesandvines.com.

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The next generation at Twines and Vines

The Hoss and the Boss

The Hoss and the Boss

It’s a new era here at Twines & Vines. With The Boss now at college, The Hoss is going to step up at the helm.  I attend a day school in the ISL, and play football, lacrosse and golf.

Off the field I spend my time bringing style to many extravagant parties hosted by my classmates.

The Boss may be moving onto college, but we still plan on writing about the prep school life here at Twines & Vines!

 

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Interview with Dave Gauntlett, Co-Founder of Wind & Waves

A few weeks back we featured the up and coming belt company out of Rhode Island, Wind & Waves. Specializing in Stirling silver plated belt buckles made in Rhode Island, and leather work done in Ohio, these belts are proudly a Made-In-America product. Today we’re back with an interview with one of the co-founding brothers of the company, Dave Gauntlett. Dave spoke with us about his background on the water, the inspiration behind Wind & Waves and the process behind starting a company.

Where did the initial idea for Wind & Waves come from? What’s your background before Wind & Waves and did this background help inspire the belts?

I suppose you could say Wind & Waves found us. Wind & Waves is really an extension of who we are. How we were raised. Fortunately, my brother Rick and I have been blessed to have grown up “on the water” as they say; boats-wood boats. Growing up, our family’s summer vacation was usually spent in Cuttyhunk and occasionally in Nantucket. And we fished; It’s what we did all day, everyday. Later in life we fished for a living. Rick and I at one time use to commercial shellfish here in Rhode Island on Narragansett Bay. A great job! I’m grateful to have also spent some time getting paid to sail and on some world famous yachts I might add. Surfing and windsurfing can also be added here, too. From food to fun we love the ocean and all it offers!

A lot of kids have ideas which they would love to take to fruition. How did you taken Wind & Waves from an idea to reality?

Wind and Waves really evolved from our other business, GRILLIE. Grillie is an affinity product that began with our late step father, Ron Pearl, who line of hood ornaments in the early 80’s. A handful of years ago Ron began prototyping the idea of doing a decorative ornament but rather than putting them on a car’s hood they would attach to the grille of a car or truck. Unfortunately, Ron was diagnosed with cancer and passed almost 3 years ago now; It was a very quick good bye. Before that day came, however, he had a sit down with us and encouraged that we pick up where he was leaving off. And we did. It took a couple years but we got the product to where it is now and had a formal launch in NYC in January 2012 at the International Gift Fair.

In March of that year, we were showing our GRILLIE line at a salt water fishing show here in Rhode Island. We have a line of fish Grillie’s and with any new product there are always questions, and one of the more common questions inferred a reference to belt buckles! This was a relatively easy endeavor for us and also one close to the heart. We already had a local artist, a RISD graduate, Cathryn who meticulously sculpts each design in clay. Lucky for us, manufacturing is here in Rhode Island and we already had those contacts. There are a lot of ground work, such as internet searches, emails and phone calls necessary to any new project as well as learning curves, and unfortunately they can become expensive. (It’s true what they say. Measure twice!) But in the end there is a great sense of accomplishment holding a finished product in hand combined with a sense of pride in the fact that both our companies products are Made in America!

What’s your goal for the future of Wind & Waves and are there other products (beside belt kits) in the pipeline currently?

The Wind & Waves product line are either an exact representation of what’s out there, such as our belt buckles or a combination of materials familiar to us or anyone living the good life. For example, look at my ‘surf boards’. ‘Surfboards’ are a stylish and practical lap desk that are great for the home. I got tired of having my laptop wobble and burn up my lap while chilling on the couch. They’re made of teak and holly. Teak and holly flooring is found in more expensive boats and is referred to as ‘soul’. I cover foam with sunbrella and fasten the cushion to the board with stainless screw snaps. I make these myself. I oil the surface of them and they are easy to maintain. I foresee more products down the line that will include various materials and hardware found in boat yards everywhere…. All pledged to be made here at home in the USA.

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5 Questions with Jack’s Heritage

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The Jack’s Heritage story began with a passion for American culture combined with an appreciation for high quality clothing. All of our products are created out of inspiration from traditional American sport, lifestyle, and our country’s unique and storied history.

Each product is produced in very limited quantities, completely in the United States. Our clothing is cut & sewn from soft, high quality fabrics and printed one-by-one in a small, one-man artisan shop in Brooklyn.

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Keeping with the tradition of Americans taking care of their own, we at JH are committed to giving back to those right here in our community who are less fortunate than ourselves. Find out how we are giving back here.

Thank you for supporting us and the entire Made in America movement.

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5 Questions with Jack’s Heritage co-founders Pete Lucchesi and Cory Fahey

Pete, where did you go to prep school in New England?

I did a PG year at Kents Hill School in Maine

How did your experience at Kents Hill influence your sense of style?

My year at Kents Hill helped me to gain an appreciation for classic American style. I went to school with a lot of New England kids who really nailed the clean and classic preppy look. My roommate was into fashion and that’s when I started to gain interest in classic American clothing. I have always liked fashion (basically a life-long GQ subscriber), but it wasn’t until that year that I really started to appreciate this country’s rich history of men’s style.

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What inspired you guys to start JH and keep the production of your shirts domestic?

It was one of those ideas that was thrown around in college, but with all of our money going to beer in those days, there wasn’t much left to start a business. Once we got into the real world, we decided to give it a go. We had a solid vision of what we wanted the product to be: super soft tees that you would want to wear lounging on the weekends, but also great fitting and stylish enough to wear out to a night on the town; and we knew what we wanted the Jack’s Heritage brand to represent: classic and laid back, with a modern edge. It took us just over a year to do research, find a manufacturer that fit our needs, and develop our product. We definitely had no idea what we were getting ourselves into. It was a lot of time and money invested, but it was a lot of fun and we said that even if we didn’t sell a single shirt, we were satisfied with what we had done. 

There was also never any doubt that this would be a “Made in the USA” brand through and through. We love this country and both of our families have roots in American manufacturing in upstate New York, so we wanted to be a small part of the Made in USA movement. There has been this resurgence of a demand for American-made heritage goods, and we’re seeing that people are willing to pay a little bit more for American ingenuity and quality. We love it and want to continue to be a part of it.

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Where do you see JH a year from now?

As any small business owners do, we have lofty goals for our company. We are also realistic, and know that it takes time to build a brand, so our main goal over the next year is to find new outlets to market our products and gain recognition. As long as we are steadily building our customer base, as we’ve been doing since December, we’ll be 100% satisfied.

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Favorite spot to rock a JH shirt?

There’s no particular spot, but you can’t beat those laid back, long summer weekends with good friends and/or family with a cold one in your hand (or in a JH koozie). That’s the perfect setting to rock a JH shirt.

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Live impressions: The Vineyard

First impression: What are a bunch of amateur actors from LA doing trying to impersonate New England prep schoolers?

Second impression: Pretty bad acting. Scratch that… really bad acting.

Third impression: Are these dudes really qualified to work at the Black Dog? Previous work experience must have included Gilly Hicks and A&F.

Fourth impression: I’m regretting watching this already.

Fifth impression: Get the girl with the cowgirl boots some braces.

Sixth impression: The scrawny blonde has wrinkles and the dude with the beard has grey hair. Yikes.

Seventh impression: The first customer is definitely a producer of the show or an owner of the BD.

Eighth impression: Normal girls who summer on the Vineyard don’t have lips like Angelina Jolie.

Ninth impression: Eerily similar to the Jersey Shore.

Tenth impression: Why are they wearing board shorts?

Eleventh impression: This makes Edgartown look like squid city.

Twelfth impression: The first mom on the show is pretty well casted for the role.

Thirteenth impression: Can’t keep doing this. Should have titled the post “13 reasons not to watch The Vineyard.

Fourteenth impression: I actually have met townies who have gotten tossed from different aquatic service schools. 

Fifteenth impression: How dare they self-proclaim themselves as preppy?!

Sixteenth impression: Haven’t seen anyone force a denim shirt on the Cape and Islands since our Chief Editor WHolley paired one with Versace denim.

Seventeenth impression: If Zuckerberg and Timberlake had a kid, it would be the squid in the denim shirt.

Eighteenth impression: Second mom needs dentures.

Nineteenth impression: Crashing townie parties is a hobby. Now I can relate.

Twentieth impression: Wholley and I do a much better job convincing strangers we know them.

Twenty First impression: The girls sound too much like the Kardashians… make it stop or bring in Lord Disick.

Twenty Second impression: They aren’t called locals in New England, sweetie. They’re townies.

Twenty Third impression: Girl crushes her drink when townie sits down with her. #TotalPowerMove

Twenty Fourth impression: Weak brawl. Weak. Sizzle down, cheeseburgers.

Twenty Fifth impression: Gonna have to live blog this again next week.

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Inside Lacrosse Post Graduate Rankings

Ahmed Iftikhar out of Deerfield (Mass.) is the top goalie in the Top 25 Post-Grad rankings. He is headed to Penn in the fall.

Inside Lacrosse recently posted an article ranking the best post graduate lacrosse players of 2013. Us private schoolers know them better as PGs. Deerfield dominated the rankings, having 5 players in the top 10.

Check out the Top 25 post-grads below.

1. Tim Stackpole
LSM/D | Army Prep (N.Y.) | Army
A physical force, Stackpole was called the “last man standing” for an injury-riddled and underachieving Army Prep squad last spring. The St. Anthony’s (N.Y.) product, ranked as the No. 13 senior two summers ago, was a significant contributor playing on EMO with a longpole in his prep year. Should bolster a depleted Black Knights’ backline immediately.

2. Danny Simonetti
M | Navy Prep (R.I.) | Ohio State
Pure speed and toughness are two main traits for Simonetti, a Long Island native dubbed “the best postgrad we played this spring” by two prep coaches. A two-handed and two-way threat who excels dodging the alleys, the 5-8, 175-pound horse can be counted on in many areas. After settling on the Buckeyes in early June, Simonetti may have a chance to help OSU’s midfield depth early.

3. Ahmed Iftikhar
G | Deerfield (Mass.) | Penn
Coming out of the Detroit suburbs, Iftikhar benefitted greatly from playing top competition in New England. “Ahmed was consistently good and just makes some incredible saves,” says one opposing coach. Attacks the ball with his quick hands and strong instincts, two qualities that will help him compete with Danny Feeney for Penn’s starting job.

4. Kevin McDonough
D | Lawrenceville (N.J.) | Penn
McDonough was somewhat underrated for much of his career at New Canaan (Conn.). That changed once he joined the Big Red — he became an absolute monster for a PG-led Lawrenceville team. Physical, athletic and quick-footed, McDonough has a shot to be the Quakers’ third or fourth defenseman as a freshman.

5. Joe French
A | Deerfield (Mass.) | Virginia
French managed to pitch in 42 points despite the stiff New England West I competition and a deep attack unit that rotated a ton. A member of Canada’s U-19 squad that took the silver medal last summer in Finland, French is highly skilled, flashy around the cage and has a thick frame. Provides nice depth for coach Dom Starsia’s attack, but also demonstrated the ability to run out of the box.

6. Jackson Finigan
M | Deerfield (Mass.) | Delaware
Opponents were impressed with the overall skillset of Finigan, a super athletic lefty who can sling from the outside with either hand. Had a strong career at Concord-Carlisle outside of Boston. Considering the Blue Hens could use another scorer or two, Finigan is expected to help shore up Delaware’s midfield immediately.

7. Grayson Helm
M | Lawrenceville (N.J.) | Bucknell
Helm is an established football and lacrosse recruit out of Duke’s and Wyomissing High (Pa.), which is well outside of Philadelphia and far from the powerhouse programs. In his postgrad year, Helm developed a deadly time-and-room shot, racking up 53 points in 18 games. There are high expectations for Helm, who will add to an excellent offense in Lewisburg.

8. Liam Kennedy
A | Deerfield (Mass.) | Notre Dame
Arguably the best finisher in the league, Kennedy thrived for the Big Green. He showed excellent awareness around the crease and a strong lacrosse IQ. Bound for South Bend, he was a significant contributor for Garden City’s 2012 Under Armour/Inside Lacrosse national champion squad. His early impact is unknown, but he has a skillset and a big frame that should get him on the field.

9. Jimmy Coughlan
A | Choate Rosemary Hall (Conn.) | Brown
Rather young for his grade at Ward Melville (N.Y.), Coughlan was a load to cover in his prep year, where he matured physically and athletically, putting up 27 goals and nine assists for the Wild Boars. A grinder, Coughlan projects favorably at the college level, where he’ll likely begin at defensive midfield.

10. Matt Brophy
M | Deerfield (Mass.) | Princeton
After a superb championship year at Fairfield Prep (Conn.) as a senior, Brophy fit in well with the Big Green offense. A talented and athletic dodger down the alley, the future Tiger battled injuries but still had a strong spring. Princeton struggled with depth this season; Brophy is part of an excellent midfield recruiting class and will fight for time.

To get a feel for the competitive nature of the Founder’s League, loaded with PGs, check out the highlights from the Deerfield/AOF game from the spring.

11. Winston Wenham
D | Northfield-Mt. Hermon (Mass.) | Syracuse

12. Gunnar Miller
M | Army Prep (N.Y.) | Army

13. Hunter Kraut
G | Hotchkiss (Conn.) | Denver

14. Grant Consoletti
A | Navy Prep (R.I.) | UMass

15. Ryan Simmons
M | Salisbury (Conn.) | Syracuse

16. Matt Rees
D | Navy Prep (R.I.) | Navy

17. Ian MacKay
A | Hill Academy (Ont.) | Vermont

18. Colin Delea
G | Phillips Exeter (N.H.) | Harvard

19. P.J. Finley
FO/M | Lawrenceville (N.J.) | Notre Dame

20. Dom Massimilian
F/O | Salisbury (Conn.) | Cornell

21. Bob Collins
M | Choate Rosemary Hall (Conn.) | Notre Dame

22. Conor Duffy
D | Choate Rosemary Hall (Conn.) | Lehigh

23. Mark Ellis
M | Westminster (Conn.) | Stony Brook

24. Sean Donnelly
A | Salisbury (Conn.) | Hobart

25. Chris Fennell
D | Navy Prep (R.I.) | Navy

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